Road Infrastructure Management Forum 2022

IPWEA NZ and RIMS are delighted to bring you the RIMS Forum 2022 on 28-29 July 2022. In 2021, we had over 180 attend over the two days of the forum and we are planning for similar numbers in 2022. We are excited about supporting regional New Zealand and having our forum in Palmerston North.

Roading Infrastructure Management Support Group (RIMS) is New Zealand’s authoritative voice on road asset and information management. We provide leadership, strategic advice and promotion of best practice to ensure consistency and efficiency across New Zealand roads. RIMS is an IPWEA NZ Special Interest Group.

Date

28-29 July 2022

Venue

Palmerston North Conference & Function Centre, 354 Main Street, Palmerston North

We will be operating under the COVID-19 Protection Framework for events.

Forum information

If you would like to discuss packages or sign up for a sponsorship /exhibition stand, then please contact Joanne at The Conference Team at 03 359 2600 or joanne@conferenceteam.co.nz.

Platinum Sponsor

Thinkproject is an international technology group providing integrated software solutions across the entire asset lifecycle from design and build to operation. This year we are launching two group solutions to New Zealand, CEMAR and Conclude CDE, to provide global-leading digital solutions for Contract Management and Common Data Environments. The RAMM Solution Suite is delivering digital innovation to enable predictive maintenance and asset optimisation capability. To achieve real data visualisation, RAMM combines asset data with 2D schematics to easily identify and interact with assets in complex structures, and will soon provide the ability to import BIM data and 3D models, convert schematics into intuitive 3D models, and ingest real-time data to support the use of Digital Twins in RAMM.  Make Intelligence Your Asset.

Gold Sponsors

A diverse and multicultural business providing New Zealand with a holistic approach to Asset Data. When we work with you, we will leave you with a legacy of ownership, great asset management decisions, fully enable and functioning contracts, establish resilience with all clients and suppliers, increase knowledge transfer and standardise and produce year on year consistent outcomes.  Roading Logistics wishes to remove all risk and present a solution whereby all activities can be accomplished.

Higgins delivers a comprehensive range of civil construction and road maintenance services across urban and rural areas. With a team of 1700 people across New Zealand and in Fiji, we have a ‘Customer No.1’ focus to provide only the very best in service, product and solutions. The foundation of the business is our values which shape our behaviours and make us a great place to work and good people to work with.

Silver Sponsor

 

Waugh Infrastructure Management is a niche consultancy that assists governments and councils with the full range of infrastructure asset management planning, from strategic planning and policy development, through to operational service delivery.

Waugh provides industry leadership within the New Zealand local government infrastructure management field, developing widely used guidance and templates designed to meet legislative and industry requirements. Waugh are infrastructure management specialists with wide domain expertise, who enjoy being part of your team and assisting in delivering the outcomes you require.

Waugh sponsor the IPWEA NZ Excellence in Asset Management Award.

 

Company-X’s reputation is built on providing world-leading software savvy teams to clients.

Co-founded by Jeremy Hughes and David Hallett in 2012, Company-X is renowned for building highly-skilled, tightly-knit, self-managed, and co-located teams that stay with projects from beginning to end and deliver software quickly.

The team of more than 50 software specialists include analysts, architects, designers, developers, testers and project managers with a can-do attitude.

Company-X built REG Insights, the world’s first national roading quality assurance web portal, in partnership with Local Government New Zealand and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency initiative the Road Efficiency Group.

Company-X helped the Asset Management Data Standard (AMDS) design team with data mapping and data migration advice for the AMDS pilot implementation project.

Other transport sector clients include the CityEdge Alliance comprising Beca, Coffey, Fletcher, Hick Bros, Higgins and Waka Kotahi who benefited from the Waikato Expressway Testing Application built by Company-X.

Bronze Sponsor

It started with the first ‘talking telegraph’ trial in 1877 which led to the formation of the New Zealand Post and Telegraph Department in 1881. What followed was 130 years of communications evolution that saw telephones in nearly every home, the privatisation of the network and birth of Telecom in 1987, and the arrival of the internet and mobile phone technology.
Now optical fibre ushers in a new era. Chorus was formed in March 2008 as a Telecom business unit operating at arm’s length from the rest of the organisation, to give all service providers access to the local fixed line network.
In December 2011, Chorus reached a major milestone, formally becoming a separate entity and listing on the New Zealand stock exchange.
Today, as New Zealand’s largest telecommunications infrastructure company, Chorus continues its long heritage of building and looking after the country’s fixed line telecommunications network for present and future generations.

WSP are the premier design, engineering and environmental consultancy of Aotearoa, creating what matters for future generations.

Bringing the very best local and global expertise to help our clients see the future more clearly and design for it today.

Our 2,000 talented people in 40 offices across New Zealand design future ready solutions in Property & Buildings, Transport, Water, Power and Environment, as well as provide project delivery and strategic consulting services.

  • We are the local experts with over 150 years in Aotearoa
  • We harness the know-how of WSP's 55,000 specialists to solve our local challenges
  • We design with and for the communities in which we work and live

wsp.com/nz

General Sponsors

 
Deighton Associates Limited (Deighton) has established itself as one of the world leaders in providing asset management systems and asset management expertise at the strategic, tactical, and operational levels for agencies around the world. Recognized as the premier software product for infrastructure asset management, dTIMS® is used to manage large infrastructure networks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, New Zealand, and the United States. These infrastructure networks include hundreds of thousands of miles of pavements, thousands of bridges, and millions of wastewater, storm water, and fresh water distribution pipe assets.

IDS (Infrastructure Decision Support), is owned by the civil engineering industry for the industry, ensuring access to leading edge deterioration modelling is kept within reach of all New Zealand Local Authorities and asset owners, regardless of size or in-house technical expertise.

The organisation provides a range of solutions for the industry to maintain, improve and protect their infrastructure networks whether it's pavement, unsealed roads, water, or footpaths.

IDS has been set up as a registered charitable entity for the purpose of ensuing sustainability of the New Zealand intellectual property for road and water renewal and replacement decision making. The company is wholly owned by IPWEA.

Data Collection Ltd specialises in collecting accurate, reliable and relevant pavement condition data.  Whether you require information on a small section of road or the whole network, we have the resources to help you make sound engineering decisions. And we don’t stop at roads, with many of our capabilities expanding into the airport, ports and railway industry. Do not hesitate to contact us if you require:

  • High Speed Data Surveys
  • Roughness Surveys
  • Video Surveys
  • FWD & HWD Testing

Fulton Hogan delivers high-quality infrastructure to improve the lives of people in Australia and New Zealand, every day. Our 7,700 strong team works in every kind of weather, creating, connecting, and caring for communities.

After nearly 90 years in business, we believe resilient infrastructure will help tackle the challenges of a changing world, and we will continue to invest and innovate to play our part.

Lonrix Limited is an agile, dynamic team of civil engineers, software engineers and data analysts. We are passionate about building products that make a positive and lasting impact on the day-to-day operations of clients across the globe.
As a team, we have more than 50 years of combined experience in software development and asset management systems. Our team members have extensive international experience, having worked on projects in Australia, India, Indonesia, South Africa, Malaysia, and New Zealand. As such we bring a wide perspective and considerable experience to each project that we undertake.
By utilising our extensive library of tools and algorithms, we can cost-effectively develop web-based applications for the smart phone age.

GHD recognises and understands the world is constantly changing. We are committed to solving the world's biggest challenges in the areas of water, energy and urbanisation.

We are a global professional services company that leads through engineering, construction and architectural expertise. Our forward-looking, innovative approaches connect and sustain communities around the world. Delivering extraordinary social and economic outcomes, we are focused on building lasting relationships with our partners and clients.

Established in 1928, we remain wholly owned by our people. We are 10,000+ diverse and skilled individuals connected by over 200 offices, across five continents – Asia, Australia, Europe, North and South America, and the Pacific region.

Find out more about us at ghd.com

 The Road Efficiency Group (REG) programme supports the New Zealand transport sector to deliver a modern integrated system to align with the objectives of local, regional and central government.

 Onsite Developments Ltd was formed in 1995 to perform routine road asset inspections for North Shore City as a sub-contractor to Fulton Hogan Ltd. Since our beginning we have developed our own inspection software enabling us to perform this niche service with efficiency and accuracy.

 
We specialise in data collection and asset inspections for the road maintenance and asset management industry.

beforeUdig is a FREE online service which enables anyone undertaking excavation works to obtain maps and safety information on the location of cables, pipes and other utility assets in and around any proposed dig site, helping to protect themselves from harm and avoid damaging valuable assets during these works.

In most cases, it provides a 'one stop shop' for contractors to communicate about their planned activities with member utilities and authorities.

If you want to be safe, it is crucial to reinforce the importance of following the Safe Excavation guidelines to reduce the chances of striking underground networks - Plan, Prepare, Pothole, Protect and Proceed. Take care of yourself and the others around you.

Request a set of utility network maps for free and online at www.beforeUdig.co.nz or by using our iOS and Android app on your phone or tablet.

Fuso New Zealand is a local family-owned business and authorised distributor of FUSO trucks, buses and genuine parts in New Zealand. FUSO is one of the best-performing and most popular brands in the country, with a proven pedigree in a wide range of applications. In 2021, FUSO was NZ’s top selling truck brand.

FUSO offers an industry-leading range, from the heavy-duty Shogun and medium-duty Fighter, to NZ’s favourite light truck, the Canter.  FUSO also leads in sustainability, offering eCanter, the first series-manufactured electric light truck.

FUSO has an established reputation for dependability, cost-effectiveness, sustainable solutions and advanced safety.

Our passionate team has a wealth of collective experience – from detailed technical knowledge to an innate understanding of what makes transport operators tick and, more importantly, what they expect from their trucks and after-sales support.

We’re not bound by corporate red tape. We’ll work fast and with flexibility to find the right solutions and make them happen for you.

www.fuso.co.nz

The InQuik modular bridge system is an innovative, patented Australian designed and manufactured product that solves the challenge of ageing infrastructure. We address cost, complexity and compliance issues to accelerate the bridge construction process. This enables Governments, Councils and road authorities to upgrade or construct infrastructure cost-effectively and efficiently.

www.inquik.com.au

9:00Welcome and opening
9:10Welcome by Tangi Utikere – MP for Palmerston North
9:15Prianyi de Silva-Currie – IPWEA NZ President
9:40Keynote: Mainstreaming Climate Mitigation into Roading Programmes, Theuns Henning – Auckland University
10:25Morning Tea proudly sponsored by
11:00Nicole Rosie, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency
 Under 35 Presentations
 11:30Ed – a smart detection system,  James Papple - Higgins
11:43 Greener outcomes – through smart planning, innovation, and collaboration.  Manukau Road – A case study, Royston Aung, Downer
11:56 Smarter resurfacing programming to reduce carbon emissions,  Willy Silcock, Fulton Hogan
12:09To be confirmed
12:25Lunch proudly sponsored by
13:15New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga, Peter Nunns
13:38International View: Our connected roadmap; deriving supply chain accountability for carbon footprint in modelling road assets, Deighton
14:00RIMS update, Alison Hermes and Alison Tomlinson
14:10IDS update, Gemma Mathieson
14:20IPWEA NZ training update, Jodie O'Doherty
14:35Optimising carbon footprints, Dr Phillipa O’Shea, Downer NZ
14:55Baselining carbon emissions – how much carbon does it take a year to operate Auckland’s Motorway network? Michaela Williams, WSP and Gemma Wadworth, ASM NZTA
15:20Afternoon Tea proudly sponsored by
15:45Rapid Downloads
16:50Keynote: Transport, climate change, and equity: the uncertain future of asset management, Bridget Burdett - Chair, Engineering New Zealand Transportation Group and Principal Researcher - MRCagney
17:30Wrap up for the day
17:30Happy hour
19:30Networking Dinner Function – RIMS around the world (optional)
22:30Close of evening

Social Programme

Happy Hour

  • When: Thurs 28 July 2022
  • Where: Around the trade, Forum venue
  • Time: 17:30 – 18:30
  • Cost: included in registration fees
  • Includes: Beverages and canapés

RIMS around the World

  • When: Thursday 28 July 2022
  • Where: Conference room, Forum venue
  • Time: 19:30 – 22:30
  • Cost: $87.00 + gst
  • Includes: Substantial walk n fork food, two beverages (thereafter cash bar) and interactive fun activities.
7.30Breakfast - Proudly sponsored by
8:15Welcome
8:20Keynote: Setting up for success - Where to start? Suzanne Watt, National Sustainability Manager, Downer NZ
 

Stream 1 - Tactical

Stream 2 - Strategic

Stream 3 - ODM sponsored by Waugh

9:15Balancing the maintenance carbon equation - Peter Mortimer and Shane Browne, Downer NZRapid prototyping solves road testing problems fast - Luke McGregor, Company XThe promises and perils of machine learning in Infrastructure Asset Management - Fritz Jooste, Lonrix Ltd
9:35Practical FWP development for the Masterton DC - Kaine Jaquiery, Masterton DCMinimise your innovation - Scott McIntryre, The DatastackApplication of a pavement wear maintenance cost tool under HPMVs - Bruce Steven & Hannah Bennett, Beca
9:55Computer vision and AL integrated with renewal and maintenance planning - Sean Rainsford, LonrixJoined up planning – putting the community first - Mike Harrison, Waitaki District CouncilHow far are we stretching our assets? - Craig Reed, Fulton Hogan
10:07Improved forward works programming outcomes through effective data driven shortlisting - Kevin Dunn, BecaPartnering for a sustainable transport supply chain, Kathy Schluter, Fuso New ZealandWhat if? The road maintenance task force ten years on - Grant Holland, Waugh
10:19Q&AQ&AQ&A
10:30Morning Tea proudly sponsored by
11:00To Maintain or rehabilitate? That is the question - Lily Grimshaw, GeosolveWhy is it so hard to create real change? - Simon Gough, GHDMulti-objective investment optimisation in a TCFD landscape: performance modelling, carbon pricing and the Paris Agreement - Claire-Louise Bode and Cal Roughan, WSP
11:20Renewal of structured road markings – and its carbon impact - Obinna Aka and Damien Douglas, WSPGore project - Erik Teekman, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Modelling maintenance costs successfully: A significant step change in performance - Mike Tapper and Lucien Zhang, Beca
11:40Overview, alignment and management of drainage and SWC FWPs - Philip van del Wel, LonrixManaging carbon & climate information - Rowan Dixon, WSPModern tools for modern data, implementing the CSA - Scott Verevis, presenting on behalf of NTA
11:52 From rules to objectives -  Sikander Singh, Tauranga City Council 
12:04Q & A
12:15Lunch proudly sponsored by
13:15Consistent condition data collection Creating opportunities to reduce our carbon footprint - Tony Lange, REG Evidence & outcomes group chair and Senior Investment Auditor, Waka Kotahi
13:30Waka Kotahi’s Asset Management data standard - Elke Beca, WSP
13:45RIMS pavement and pathways fault assessment standard -  Shahaanan Arulgnanapragasam, WSP
14:00ONF Project - Caroline Dumas
14:15Q&A
14:25Afternoon tea proudly sponsored by
14:55Awards and Exhibitor Draw
15:00Keynote: Sandra King
15:20Keynote: People first - higher competency leads to lower carbon emissions - Roger Brady, REG and Jeremy Hughes, Company-X
16:00Wrap Up | Event Close

Registration fees – exclude gst

Inclusions: Full registrations include morning and afternoon teas, lunches, happy hour Thursday and breakfast Friday morning.

RIMS around the World networking function on Thursday evening is an additional cost - $87.00 + gst and can be booked at the time of registering. The dinner will be a fun interactive evening with substantial walk n fork food.

 

Super earlybird
26 Oct – 17 Dec

Earlybird
17 Dec – 27 June

Standard
28 June - 27 July

Networking dinner

Member

$610.00

$660.00

$710.00

$87 GST

U35

$450.00

$480.00

$510.00

$87 GST

Non-member

$760.00

$810.00

$860.00

$87 GST

One-day only (choose 27 July or 28 July)

Member

$350.00

$380.00

$410.00

$87 GST

Non-member

$450.00

$480.00

$510.00

$87 GST

 Click here to register!

COVID policy

The COVID policy for this event will follow the Governments COVID-19 Protection Framework at the time of the event.

  • Traffic light green – in person – attendees will be encouraged to wear face coverings and sign in. 
  • Traffic light orange – In person – Vaccine pass and sign-in required with masks encouraged. 
  • Traffic light red – RIMS around the World networking function will be cancelled and refunded after the forum. Streaming available. Avoidable costs will be refunded after the forum depending on timing of traffic light change.

Accommodation

The RIMS Forum is holding rooms at the Copthorne Hotel, 110 Fitzherbert Avenue – 9 min walk to the Forum venue.  Accommodation can be booked at the same time you register for the forum.  All nights must be prepaid at the time of booking.

Cancellations or amendments may incur a fee.  If you cancel your accommodation with the Copthorne Hotel within 30 days of the forum, you will only be refunded the cost if your room can be on-sold.

Superior double | twin room - $175.00 per night incl gst – single | double | twin occupancy, on a room only basis.

To comply with the Framework, Millennium | Copthorne Hotels and Resorts will be requiring vaccine certificates for all hotel guests and visitors to the hotel premises (including restaurants, bars, meeting spaces, swimming and spa pools, spa facilities and gyms).    Persons who do not have a valid My Vaccine Pass will be asked to leave the hotel premises immediately.

Rooms include sky tv, mini bar, high speed internet, iron & iron board, hair dryer, IDD phone, tea and coffee making facilities and ensuite with shower.

Registration cancellations

Cancellations must be in writing.  An administration fee of $100 will be charged on all cancellations prior to 22 February 2022.  Thereafter refunds will be at the discretion of the organising committee and will be processed after the forum.  No refunds will be made for late arrival or early departure.  Registrations may be reassigned to another person from the same organisation without penalty.  Please notify The Conference Team of any changes prior to conference.

Hotel cancellations

A change to your hotel booking could incur a penalty being charged by the Copthorne Hotel.  The hotel will charge a full cancellation fee for any cancellation within 30 days of conference.  If we can on sell your accommodation, we will.

Disclaimer

The organising committee reserve the right to change activities, topics, and presenters where necessary.  Neither the organisers (The Conference Team), IPWEA NZ or RIMS shall be liable for any loss caused by the cancellation or abandonment of the event where such cancellation is due to Force Majeure.  The term “Force Majeure” means any circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the organisers including but not limited to war, hostilities (whether war be declared or not), terrorism, aircraft hijacking, military operation, riot, civil war, rebellion, civil commotion or unrest, pandemics, or natural disasters, Acts or Regulations of government, refusal to grant visas, explosions, transport delays, transport difficulties and the insolvency of airline carriers.  The organisers will use all reasonable efforts to conduct the event despite the intervention or occurrence of any such cause.  Changes will be notified on this website.

The committee reserves the right to amend any component as required.  All changes will be updated on the website.

Privacy

By completing this registration form you acknowledge that the details supplied by you may be made available to the Conference Committee and accommodation providers (for the purposes of room bookings).  Your details will be included in the delegate list unless you have indicated otherwise on the registration form.  This listing will include your name | organisation and city and does not include your email address.

Day 1 Speakers

Tangi Utikere, MP for Palmerston North

Day 1 Welcome

Bio

Tangi is passionate about social justice, equality of opportunity and fairness. With a professional background which combines Local Government and Education, Tangi’s connection to the community is wide and his understanding of the issues that affect the lives and livelihoods of New Zealanders is vast.

Prior to his election as the Member of Parliament for the Palmerston North Electorate in 2020, Tangi served 10 years on the City Council, and was the city’s first elected member of Pasifika heritage. Tangi was appointed Deputy Mayor in 2016, a role he relinquished upon his election to Parliament.

Whilst a member of the City Council, Tangi made it his priority to work with people from right across the political spectrum. Combined with his focus on policy and practice, Tangi made a significant contribution to the areas of multiculturalism, education, resource management and racing. With a keen interest in justice and fairness of process, Tangi has been extensively involved in the criminal justice system as a Judicial Justice of the Peace, Visiting Justice and was an inaugural Commissioner with the Criminal Cases Review Commission.

Tangi is currently involved in two select committees. He is a member of the Health Select Committee and the Environment Select Committee.

Priyani de Silva-Currie, IPWEA NZ President

Day 1 Keynote

Bio

Priyani has over 25 years’ experience in governance and infrastructure asset management across multiple sectors including transport, waters, property and buildings, energy and utilities, telecommunications and infrastructure. Priyani specializes in public infrastructure asset management for local and central government throughout Australasia and the Pacific. Priyani has recently joined Beca as their Principal Asset Advisory.

Prior to joining Beca Priyani was the Acting National Infrastructure Property Manager for Waka Kotahi.  Previous roles include Regional Leader Central and New Zealand Asset Management Leader with Calibre; Partner, Business Manager and Principal Asset Management Consultant at Opus International Consultants (WSP); and Business and Community Assets Advisor and Energy Manager at Nelson City Council.

Within the governance sector Priyani is the President of IPWEA New Zealand and a Director of IPWEA Australasia. Priyani has held various community and industry roles including the President of Multicultural NZ (MNZ), Chairperson and Life Member of Carbon and Energy Professional (EMANZ). Within local communities Priyani was the President of the Manawatu Multicultural Council and Nelson Multicultural Council.

Priyani is a Teaching Fellow at the University of Auckland and guest lectures at Massey University, Otago Polytechnic and Weltec in leadership and asset management practice, is a qualified Assessor of NZ Diploma in Asset Management and NZ Certificate in Procurement.  Priyani is also an Accredited Better Business Case Practitioner BBC ®.  Priyani has undertaken formal leadership and coaching training through Calibre, NZIM and Opus Leadership Academy and also within her sporting passion of Netball where she has coached NPC, Representative and Premier teams in the Manawatu, Central Zone and Nelson.  When Priyani is at play she loves to go boating, fish, spend time with her family, and occasionally take her 1975 Thunderbird out for a burn.

Theuns Henning

Mainstreaming Climate Mitigation into Roading Programmes

Bio

Based in Auckland, New Zealand, Dr Theuns Henning holds many roles within the civil engineering industry, drawing on his academic background and industry experience.

A Senior Lecturer at the University of Auckland, he is also a founding member of the Climate Adaptation Platform, specialising in Asset Management, Performance Monitoring, Climate Adaptation, Performance Based Contracts and Benchmarking.

Passionately committed to ensuring the betterment of the industry, Dr Henning is the Chief Executive Officer at Infrastructure Decision Support (IDS), which comes under the umbrella of The Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA). IDS provide industry leadership in the development, advocacy, and implementation of evidence-based decision making for infrastructure.

In his role at IDS, Dr Henning was part of the original implementation of dTIMS (asset management modelling software) into New Zealand and continues to manage the national distribution and implementation of this tool.

Dr Henning has worked with many large organisations such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. In this capacity, his focus has been on Performance Based Contracting, Climate Adaptation, Asset Management and the development of design and decision-making guidelines.

Dr Henning is a published author of 42 international journals, Six Road Infrastructure Management (RIMS) Body of Knowledge Guidelines and is the primary author of four World Bank Guidelines for developing countries. He holds a Master of Engineering (Transportation) from the University of Pretoria, South Africa and completed his PhD at the University of Auckland in 2009, where he was the recipient of the Foundation for Research and Technology Bright Future Scholarship.

Presentation

Topic:Mainstreaming Climate Mitigation into Roading Programmes

Limited are the days for undertaking investment analysis and road maintenance programming solely based on economic principles. The pressures on transport services increasingly include customer service expectations, resilience to natural events and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In New Zealand, the Transport Sector accounts for over 40% of the CO2 emissions and over 19% of the total Greenhouse Gas emissions (Source MoE).

Arguably there are great expectations for addressing the high CO2 through a widescale adoption of electronic and hybrid vehicles. However, the transitions of a total vehicle fleet will take time and relying on that alone will not achieve our ambitious carbon footprint targets. The road construction sector also has a significant role to play. Good progress exists in understanding the carbon footprint of different road construction material techniques and some elements of life-cycle considerations.

New Zealand, however, is not a world leader for embedding carbon principles into our renewal and maintenance programmes nor in any of our asset management processes. Some developing countries have made more progress, mainly due to donor organisations applying pressures towards achieving greener outcomes. For example, in their Climate Change Action Plan (2021–25), the World Bank requires every investment proposal to include a minimum of 35% climate benefits that include mitigation and adaptation. This keynote will explore mechanisms and processes to mainstream climate mitigation into asset management planning and delivery of road transport programmes.

James Papple, Higgins

Ed – a smart detection system

Bio

James is a Business Analyst at Higgins within the Systems Team. He has been with the company since 2019 and was born and raised in Palmy. James and the team are striving towards the modernisation and digitisation of Higgins processes and systems. Using whole of business knowledge, he is able to make recommendations based on what is best for the company.

Presentation

Topic: Technology supporting the changes in road asset management

‘Ed’ – short for Entity Detection – is a smart, automated asset detection system which uses artificial intelligence to make logging and reporting of roading assets a breeze.

Higgins uses this innovative technology to help prioritise maintenance activities on our networks while also providing top quality data that allow our customers to make efficient and informed evidence-based decisions about their assets.

Importantly the use of Ed also results in a reduction in carbon emissions.

Less vehicles on the network

Having reliable footage of the networks allows inspectors to review the network in the office reducing the need for inspectors to go out and recheck a site reducing carbon emissions and also avoids unnecessary disruption to the travelling public.

Early detection of pavement issues

ED also allows inspectors to record pavement defects. Early detection of defects allows our team to fix issues before they can develop into larger bodies of work involving greater use of heavy carbon emitting machinery.

Frees up time

Ed technology frees up our people to spend time elsewhere improving the safety and efficiency of our networks. For example, prior to Ed in 2019 when we were bidding on the New Plymouth NOC, it took just two days to drive the entire network, but then it took two team members three weeks to manually watch the video to log the pavement defects.

Safety

The capture of the video of our road networks for analysis is all done from the comfort of our survey vehicle driving through the network. This automatic capture of data for analysis avoids the need to leave the vehicle, both avoiding disruption to the travelling public and importantly keeping our road inspectors safe.

Nicole Rosie, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency

Bio

Nicole Rosie joined Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency as Chief Executive in February 2020.

Before her appointment, Nicole was the CE of Worksafe for three years. She has more than two decades of senior executive experience across the public and private sectors. This includes a range of industries and functions, such as transport and commercial firms, including Toll NZ and Fonterra.

Nicole is passionate about making a difference and sees the land transport system and the critical roles Waka Kotahi plays across infrastructure, regulation and safety as being at the heart of a successful New Zealand.

Royston Aung, Downer NZ

Greener outcomes – through smart planning, innovation, and collaboration. Manukau Road – A case study

Bio

Bio to come

Presentation

In July 2021 as part of the Auckland Transport Central Road Corridor Maintenance Contract, Downer was tasked with resurfacing 31,000m2 of asphalt on Manukau Road, one of Auckland’s busiest and most heavily congested roads. Done traditionally (at night) the project was expected to take between 4 to 6 weeks depending on weather delays to complete and create at least 18 days of disruption for over 170 local business and stakeholders including schools, medical facilities, places of worship and a shopping mall, not to mention the risk created by having 28 transverse joints as a result of paving over 18 shifts.

This presented Downer and Auckland Transport with an opportunity to push the boundaries of a traditional approach, rethink the methodology and create a solution that would maximise efficiencies, minimise disruption to our stakeholders, and importantly reduce our overall carbon emissions. The final solution was to complete the project over 2 weekend blocks during school holidays with an additional 2 nightshifts.

The new methodology reduced the project duration and stakeholder disruption by 70% when compared with the traditional solution.

Aside from the great outcome itself one the biggest benefits of the new methodology were the overall reduction seen in carbon emissions over the duration of the project. The project has identified the impact operational planning can have on the total emissions of a project as well as highlighting the impact on emissions from asphalt production.

Using data collected from vehicle monitoring technology and the plant machine hours onsite the project has shown that through innovation, collaboration, and willingness to challenge the status quo maintenance contracts can have a positive impact on reducing carbon emissions and even go some way to helping offsetting the emissions from asphalt plants.

Willy Silcock, Fulton Hogan

Smarter resurfacing programming to reduce carbon emissions

Bio

Willy is an Asset Engineer within the Engineering Solutions Team at Fulton Hogan.

Willy’s extensive road maintenance and asset management knowledge has been developed through the Fulton Hogan Graduate Programme, Contract Manager for the Banks Peninsula Maintenance Contract and as a National RAMM Resource. Willy leverages his operational and technical knowledge to support the Fulton Hogan business through his current role, National Contract Delivery Engineer. Developing innovative and practical solutions to common maintenance problems is central to Willy’s role.

Presentation

The cost to implement our resurfacing programme and the associated carbon footprint are significant.These activities contribute to the work and therefore the carbon footprint:

  • Extracting and processing the aggregate
  • Transporting the aggregate to stockpile
  • Transportation from stockpile to site
  • Transportation of construction equipment to site
  • Constructing the resurfacing
  • Traffic management
  • Traffic delays
  • Disestablishment of construction equipment.

Smart data analysis and application of these performance insights into operational decision making can significantly reduce the carbon footprint by:

  1. Robust analysis of treatment selection, and treatment and aggregate performance to minimise travel time, reduce traffic delays and reduce carbon emission (these vary depending on the treatment solution).
  2. Optimising the total km of resurfacing (and the number of sites) achieved each day by looking at adjacent sites, which are due for resurfacing within the next 1 – 3 years, and bringing that site(s) forward so that 2 or more sites can be combined and sealed within the same day
    We have developed a process to calculate the emissions and therefore we are able to determine the associated carbon savings.

Declan Watt, Fulton Hogan

Using technology to reduce the maintenance footprint

Bio

Getting practical and easy to use products into the hands of our users is one of Declan’s top priorities. We need to empower our users by providing them with the correct tools and implementing the right processes to work efficiently and drive strong performance outcomes. Working within the Engineering Solutions Information Systems team at Fulton Hogan, he is regularly involved in unique and exciting projects that mould and improve the landscape of road maintenance in New Zealand.

Presentation

Topic: Using technology to reduce the maintenance footprint

Getting inspectors off the road, reducing the number and duration of vehicle-based inspections and ensuring these inspections are undertaken at traffic speed will provide a safer workplace and reduce the carbon footprint. Following inspections, maintenance programmes and routes can be optimised. 

There are several aspects to this:

Smart ways to minimise the number of inspections

Through the use of technology e.g. Internet of Things (IOT), the frequency of asset condition inspections can be minimised.  Pavement and surfacing inspections are undertaken using video imaging and machine learning, within a vehicle travelling at normal traffic speed.

Smart systems to optimise the route

Through route optimisation software, the most cost-effective inspection route for each inspection type can be planned.  Similarly, the same process is used for optimising the route for each maintenance crew.

Smart tools to identify the location of the maintenance activities while in the field

Through the application of geo-fencing, electronic tracking of crews and specific work-related live dashboards, the start and end points of activities e.g. no spraying zones, can be identified to optimise event response, while keeping Clients informed in real-time.

The outcomes from increased technology in maintenance inspections are:

  • Increased safety of the workforce and travelling public
  • Reduced carbon footprint.

Hisham Ibrahim, Deighton

Our connected roadmap; deriving supply chain accountability for carbon footprint in modelling road assets

Bio

Hisham works as a Business Development Associate for Deighton in the South Pacific. He graduated from the University of Auckland in 2007 as an electrical engineer and did his Masters of Engineering Management focusing on Asset Management and Facility Management operations research.
Recently in 2020, Hisham completed his Master of Business Administration from Macquarie University in Sydney where he continues to volunteer and develop strategic decision modelling frameworks.

Hisham served in various technical consulting and project management roles in New Zealand, Australia and the Middle East for clients in Defence, Government, Education, Healthcare, Research and Commercial industry sectors. He is an avid technology investor and follower, with machine learning deployments for resource re-adaptation, Life Cycle Analysis and Multi-factor optimisation as priority drivers to realising industry environmental and operational efficiency goals. He is currently based in Sydney, Australia.

Presentation

Topic: Operations Modelling and Carbon Footprint

As countries continue to pledge reductions in carbon emissions, the regulatory bodies have turned to environmental data to debunk
carbon reduction pledge claims against show increasing rate of carbon emissions compared to last decade. To add to this, the entities likely responsible for carbon emissions do operate in silos, complicating carbon emission monitoring efforts in ensuring accountability.
A powerful proponent for managing environmental carbon footprint stems from proper impact auditing and operations modelling;
coupled with dissemination of this information at key recipients to influence decision-making and multi-factor optimisation for governments,
councils, businesses.

This topic will be delivered in four points:

  1. A brief rundown of how entities assess carbon emissions presently.
  2. Current challenges hindering proper carbon footprint accounting – natural vs industrial.
  3. The carbon-modelling ecosystem represented in a connected roadmap and the benefits of environmental best-practice accountability.

In this presentation, we will also outline few case studies and examples of government entities promoting carbon transparency, sharing their operations’ modelling and the resulting opportunities harnessed through:

  • Creating targeted corporate and public awareness with respect to operations’ environmental efforts and aims
  • Providing a benchmark for continual operations improvement and comparative efforts for carbon accounting
  • Holding vertical supply-chain cooperative players accountable for their carbon footprint activity and inspiring cooperation
  • Sharing environmentally friendly best-practices to ensure the industry keeps at the cutting edge of carbon-minimisation efforts.

The presentation also aims to outline other benefits of the connected roadmap, such as:

  • Promoting recycling by-products with allied industries
  • Smart-energy operations to optimise use of renewable energy
  • Proper forecasting and resource management to ride along the efficiency curve.

Phillipa O’Shea, Downer NZ

Optimising carbon footprints

Bio

Phillipa is the Principal Asset Strategy Engineer for Downer. She has been with Downer for nearly 15 years and was previously involved the with rail and water industry in the asset management space. She is responsible for supporting the Downer Asset Management Community with their predictive analytical needs and supporting the teams and systems delivering asset management services through their Asset Management Improvement Plans.

Presentation

In April 2016 New Zealand was one of 185 countries that signed up to the UNFCCC agreement to reduce global warming by 2oC by reducing carbon dioxide equivalent emissions (CO2e). 

In 2013 to 2014 New Zealand’s gross emissions increased by 1% to 81.1 million tonnes CO2e. In the year 2018-2019 the emissions have decreased by 4.2% to 78.9 million tonnes CO2e, but much more needs to be done. The energy sector, including transport and electricity production, is the second largest contributor at 40% of total emissions with agriculture being the largest. The transport sector will be key to meeting NZ’s nationally determined contributions (NDCs). The decision to sign up to this commitment will have an impact on all Road Controlling Authorities (RCA’s) and what policy requirements the roading industry will have to implement.

As an environmentally conscious organisation, Downer tracks and reports on its energy consumption and CO2e emissions and have introduced a range of initiatives to reduce their impact. Their annual energy consumption is in the region of 1,493.08TJ, with the largest contributor being diesel used in their Infrastructure Services division.

5 years ago, Downer started to assess the CO2e emissions for road maintenance activities to understand their carbon footprint and impact over the life cycle of each treatment method. An example of initial findings suggested that Stabilisation has 10% lower impact than a Digout. However, looking at the whole life cycle Stabilisation has double the CO2e impact.

The calculation of these carbon footprints is reliant on accurate data.  The project’s aim was, through field data capture, to validate the data collected through our plant system to see whether it could be relied on to quantify CO2e emissions for maintenance activities in the future. In short, the answer is yes it can. Now to take this thinking to the next level.

Future decision making around strategy and treatment selection may then consider the total life cycle costs and impacts of the different maintenance and renewal types as an optimisation tool in predictive analytics.

In this way, Downer can support its clients to reduce impact on climate change and recognise their positive contributions to the sustainable built environment.

Michaela Williams, WSP

Baselining carbon emissions – how much carbon does it take a year to operate Auckland’s Motorway network?

Bio

Michaela is an Environment and Sustainability Advisor in the Auckland System Management Alliance. Michaela prepared ASM’s first GHG inventory and is the lead coordinater for implementing the ASM’s Energy Efficiency Strategic Priority Action Plan and is concurrently undertaking a Masters in Urban Planning (Professional).

Presentation

Co-presented with Gemma Wadworth.

Topics:

  • Measuring carbon
  • Collaboration to reduce our impact on the environment
  • Are decisions driven by data?
  • Technology supporting the changes in road asset management

Measuring carbon is critical for the Road Infrastructure Maintenance Industry to understand how asset maintenance activities contribute to road transport emissions and identify opportunities for energy and emissions reductions. Auckland System Management Alliance (ASM) deliver the Operation and Maintenance Contract for the Auckland Motorway Network and has undertaken a Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory during the first year of the contract to provide a baseline to drive emission reduction initiatives.  It is important for ASM to align with Waka Kotahi’s sustainability objectives and focus to achieve ‘reduced energy and carbon’, outlined in their Resource Efficiency and Waste Minimisation Strategy released in 2021. 

ASM maintain a variety of assets which seven departments are responsible for the management, delivery, and operation of. Due to the complex nature of the Project, it was important to maintain a collaborative process with teams, so multiple workshops and interviews were held at the outset of the Project to delineate the scope of the GHG inventory and to ensure the establishment of robust data reporting lines.

The outcome of this process is that ongoing engagement and systems have now been embedded in the organisation to enable emissions data to be collected through the duration of the contract.  The prioritisation to transform ASM operations to reduce GHG emissions by incorporating it into the strategic priorities and KPIs will facilitate decision making around carbon reduction efforts.  

Using existing organisational structure processes results in reporting of data becoming streamlined and BAU. A leadership-driven process is also critical to incorporate GHG reductions into ASM’s strategic priorities and KPIs.

The resulting consistent data reporting and leadership driven implementation encourages ideas to be developed organisation-wide and enables analysis of new initiatives to identify those that are high impact and cost effective to prioritise and deliver on emission reduction targets. 

Gemma Wadworth, ASM, NZTA

Baselining carbon emissions – how much carbon does it take a year to operate Auckland’s Motorway network?

Bio

Gemma is an Environment and Sustainability Advisor in the Auckland System Management Alliance, and part of the team implementing the Energy Efficiency Strategic Priority.

Gemma has experience working on Infrastructure Sustainability Rating tools, including on the Ara Tūhono – Pūhoi to Warkworth Motorway PPP Project and is a Greenroads® Sustainable Transport Professional.

Presentation

Co-presented with Michaela Williams.

Topics:

  • Measuring carbon
  • Collaboration to reduce our impact on the environment
  • Are decisions driven by data?
  • Technology supporting the changes in road asset management

Measuring carbon is critical for the Road Infrastructure Maintenance Industry to understand how asset maintenance activities contribute to road transport emissions and identify opportunities for energy and emissions reductions. Auckland System Management Alliance (ASM) deliver the Operation and Maintenance Contract for the Auckland Motorway Network and has undertaken a Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory during the first year of the contract to provide a baseline to drive emission reduction initiatives.  It is important for ASM to align with Waka Kotahi’s sustainability objectives and focus to achieve ‘reduced energy and carbon’, outlined in their Resource Efficiency and Waste Minimisation Strategy released in 2021. 

ASM maintain a variety of assets which seven departments are responsible for the management, delivery, and operation of. Due to the complex nature of the Project, it was important to maintain a collaborative process with teams, so multiple workshops and interviews were held at the outset of the Project to delineate the scope of the GHG inventory and to ensure the establishment of robust data reporting lines.

The outcome of this process is that ongoing engagement and systems have now been embedded in the organisation to enable emissions data to be collected through the duration of the contract.  The prioritisation to transform ASM operations to reduce GHG emissions by incorporating it into the strategic priorities and KPIs will facilitate decision making around carbon reduction efforts.  

Using existing organisational structure processes results in reporting of data becoming streamlined and BAU. A leadership-driven process is also critical to incorporate GHG reductions into ASM’s strategic priorities and KPIs.

The resulting consistent data reporting and leadership driven implementation encourages ideas to be developed organisation-wide and enables analysis of new initiatives to identify those that are high impact and cost effective to prioritise and deliver on emission reduction targets. 

Bridget Doran

Transport, climate change, and equity: the uncertain future of asset management

Bio

Bridget Doran is a Chartered Engineer in transport with a doctorate in cognitive psychology. Her PhD was an investigation into the roles of mind wandering and autopilot in everyday driving, and their links with road safety.

For the last three years Bridget has worked at MRCagney where she is a Principal Researcher, based in Hamilton. She works on transport research, policy, and practice for a variety of government, university, and private sector clients around New Zealand. Bridget regularly presents on inclusive access and road safety to audiences of transport professionals and community, with a focus on challenging us all to think about what ‘best practice’ means for the people we work with, and those we serve.

Bridget is Chair of Engineering New Zealand’s Transportation Group. The Transportation Group has 1,200 members, comprising professionals with a wide variety of backgrounds who work on transport policy, planning, and engineering. In her role as Chair Bridget is an advocate for uncovering inconvenient truths in the links and gaps between policy rhetoric, and what actually happens in transport policy, planning and investment.

Bridget is known as a provocative and engaging speaker.

Presentation

Transport’s contribution to carbon emissions is a complex product of embodied and emitted carbon. The trailpipe emissions from vehicles are just one consideration. Building new road lanes perpetuates the myth that personal car travel is an efficient and sustainable way for people to move freely around their local communities – so why do we need to change that story, where should we start, and what does infrastructure management have to do with it?

In this presentation Bridget will discuss the systems levers involved in carbon emissions for the transport sector. It will include the more obvious connections to carbon dioxide, and less obvious but nonetheless powerful drivers of ongoing overconsumption in the transport sector. She will also discuss the role of habit and effort in decision-making, with critique of the ways our investment decisions perpetuate the status quo.

Bridget will also discuss recent work on the place for equity and consideration of the needs of disabled people in transport planning, with a focus on pedestrian and public transport infrastructure. The risks of worsening inequity as climate change starts to impact everyone’s lives directly will be presented.

Day 2 Speakers

Suzanne Watt, Downer NZ

Setting up for success - Where to start?

Bio

Suzanne joined Downer NZ from Worksafe New Zealand where she has spent the last 2+ years working collaboratively across New Zealand to deliver key initiatives for the Construction, Utilities and Facilities sector including the Good Practice Guide for Road and Roadside Workers and Whakaiti Kino (a project engaging with Industry to develop utility strike reduction strategies).

Suzanne has previously worked for Downer in Dunedin and prior to that had 13 years working for the Otago Regional Council. She brings a strong background in environmental resource management across a variety of disciplines including air and water quality, waste management and strategic planning and delivery. In addition, she has working knowledge of the transport sector from central government through to small contractors and understands the climate change challenges we face as a sector.

Her collaborative work across the Otago region driving behaviour change is a key element of her role as National Sustainability Manager at Downer. She holds a Master of Science with Honours and is currently studying with the Institute of Directors and at the University of Cambridge in Sustainability Leadership.

Presentation

Carbon reduction is the Construction sector’s biggest challenge for the next 13-30 years. This challenge isn’t simply how many electric cars we can roll into our light vehicle fleets, it’s about how we push, challenge, and collaborate as a sector to create the changes we need in how we do business. It’s about using the leverage of our demand to drive both supply and technological advances that will enable and support us on our journey.

Our leaders must set us up for success through their partnerships and understanding of how to make change happen in our own organisations, but it’s you who will be delivering the changes that give the essential results. It’s going to take foresight, understanding, and speed of action – so where do we start?

Peter Mortimer, Downer NZ

Balancing the maintenance carbon equation

Bio

Peter is the National Asset Manager, Transport for Downer. He has been with Downer for 20 years and was previously involved in design engineering, design management, road surface engineering and asset engineering.

He is responsible for supporting the people and systems delivering Asset Management services across Downer transport sector contracts.

Presentation

Co-presented with Shane Browne

As New Zealand moves towards net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, selecting appropriate maintenance treatments will be an important part of the solution for reaching that target. Improvements to the way we select maintenance treatment will help by:

Better understanding the impact of maintenance treatment life, and
Incorporating the estimated emissions of maintenance treatments over a lifecycle analysis period.

Downer’s maintenance treatment selection tool aims to tackle both issues. The tool uses a combination of traffic, pavement depth and pavement performance data (Traffic Speed Deflectometer) to estimate the life of maintenance treatment at a patch level. The results are visualised onto a GIS mapping tool and mobile field application, allowing users to quickly assess the impact of various maintenance treatments in the context of estimated life and carbon intensity. In addition, the output categorises each treatment option allowing users to quickly compare each treatment.

By adding the outcome of previous work completed by Downer in 2017 in calculating the carbon footprint of maintenance activities, we can now calculate the estimated carbon intensity of maintenance treatments over any analysis period.

Monitoring the actual life of each treatment selected by the maintenance treatment tool against the estimated life will increase the accuracy of the forecast in the future.

The key learnings from the development of the tool are:

  • Maintenance treatment life expectancy is highly dependent on pavement thickness, subgrade strength, deflection curvature, loading and treatment performance characteristics.
  • Selecting the correct visualisation tool is critical in helping key stakeholders digest big data and help decision-making.
  • Adding the carbon intensity calculated provides another perspective to consider when making treatment selection decisions. How the carbon intensity profile is valued over time will become more important.

Shane Browne, Downer NZ

Balancing the maintenance carbon equation

Bio

Peter is the National Asset Manager, Transport for Downer. He has been with Downer for 20 years and was previously involved in design engineering, design management, road surface engineering and asset engineering.

He is responsible for supporting the people and systems delivering Asset Management services across Downer transport sector contracts.

Presentation

Co-presented with Peter Mortimer

As New Zealand moves towards net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, selecting appropriate maintenance treatments will be an important part of the solution for reaching that target. Improvements to the way we select maintenance treatment will help by:

Better understanding the impact of maintenance treatment life, and
Incorporating the estimated emissions of maintenance treatments over a lifecycle analysis period.

Downer’s maintenance treatment selection tool aims to tackle both issues. The tool uses a combination of traffic, pavement depth and pavement performance data (Traffic Speed Deflectometer) to estimate the life of maintenance treatment at a patch level. The results are visualised onto a GIS mapping tool and mobile field application, allowing users to quickly assess the impact of various maintenance treatments in the context of estimated life and carbon intensity. In addition, the output categorises each treatment option allowing users to quickly compare each treatment.

By adding the outcome of previous work completed by Downer in 2017 in calculating the carbon footprint of maintenance activities, we can now calculate the estimated carbon intensity of maintenance treatments over any analysis period.

Monitoring the actual life of each treatment selected by the maintenance treatment tool against the estimated life will increase the accuracy of the forecast in the future.

The key learnings from the development of the tool are:

  • Maintenance treatment life expectancy is highly dependent on pavement thickness, subgrade strength, deflection curvature, loading and treatment performance characteristics.
  • Selecting the correct visualisation tool is critical in helping key stakeholders digest big data and help decision-making.
  • Adding the carbon intensity calculated provides another perspective to consider when making treatment selection decisions. How the carbon intensity profile is valued over time will become more important.

Luke McGregor, Company-X

Rapid prototyping solves road testing problem fast

Bio

Company-X software architect and senior developer Luke McGregor was technology lead on City Edge Alliance Waikato Expressway Testing Application.

Luke has 17 years’ experience and is passionate about developing successful software. Cutting edge technology’s potential to facilitate innovative, simple and seamless solutions to complex problems excites Luke. He gets energy from working alongside other talented developers who take pride in their work. Pride in performance with quality, timely results reflect his values of integrity, achievement and expertise.

Since joining Company-X in 2017, Luke has worked on a variety of projects from large multinationals to small start-ups.  This has meant working with many technologies, platforms and people to solve problems ranging from designing complex technical systems, to beloved user experiences.

Presentation

CityEdge Alliance manufacturing engineer James Higgins and process manager Vicky Wells looked to Waikato software specialist Company-X for help because of its experience in the sector building the Road Efficiency Group Insights tool.

Company-X solutions architect Luke McGregor did some rapid prototyping and explored the different ways that the data could be visualised. Company-X gave CityEdge Alliance its first prototypes to look at in less than a week and the solution was iterated from there.

CityEdge came to Company-X with a hosted system in mind, but instead Company-X designed and developed a web browser-based application that did not store data on a server. This solved the problem with reduced build time and cost.
The final solution was ready for use three months after work began and used daily by about 50 CityEdge Alliance users.

Three Key Points of Learning
:

  1. What you really need, isn’t always what you think you need when it comes to building software. Come to the table with the problem in mind, rather than the solution.
  2. Rapid software prototypes can be spun up quickly, to ensure the project starts on the right foot.
  3. The Agile approach to software development is the best. Split the work into short, fast bursts and review development progress as you go.

Fritz Jooste, Lonrix Ltd

The promises and perils of machine learning in Infrastructure Asset Management

Bio

Fritz Jooste has been working in the field of pavement design and asset management for more than 25 years. He earned his PhD from Texas A&M University in 1997 and since then has been involved primarily in research and with the development of systems related to pavement design and asset management.

Fritz is a founder and director of Juno Services Ltd and Lonrix Ltd.

Presentation

Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) have, over the last decade, become familiar words for most engineers involved in infrastructure asset management.

Although most of the ML algorithms were first published several decades ago, it is only now, in the era of massively parallel computers and large data sets, that the science of ML and AI is coming into its own in infrastructure asset management. ML and AI are promising technologies, and the potential for them to transform aspects of the asset management landscape is significant. However, these technologies also bring new challenges to the asset management domain. Some of these challenges are technical (e.g., how to incorporate them into older legacy systems), and some of them affect the human aspects of the asset management workflow.

This presentation will provide an entertaining and colourful look at the potential for ML and AI technologies to transform aspects of the asset management landscape (with a focus on deterioration modelling). Using both practical experience as well as established theory, the presentation will then look at the perils and limitations of these technologies.

In particular, the presentation will discuss what a widespread implementation of these technologies may mean for engineers and for the inherited knowledge base that currently forms the basis of much of the asset management domain.

Kaine Jaquiery, Masterton District Council

Practical FWP development for the Masterton District Council

Bio

Kaine currently resides and works in the lovely Wairarapa, where he grew up and went to school. His current role at Masterton District Council as Roading Services Manager, allows him to give back to the community he loves and grew up in.

Kaine gets enjoyment from the opportunities and challenges presented to him within this profession and is most excited when innovating and seeing projects that make a positive impact on people.

He served in the British Armed Forces, Royal Engineers from 2001 – 2007. The army not only trained him as an engineer but also as a land surveyor, with his last deployment being to Afghanistan in the Helmand District where he served in an engineering air support role.

After leaving the military he was employed by May Gurney as a surveyor/site engineer where he was involved in the construction of large municipal landfills across Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk.

Moving back to New Zealand in 2009 and following a role in local government, he worked at MWH (now Stantec) as a transportation engineer, supporting senior engineers to deliver safety orientated solutions for clients such as Kiwirail and NZTA.

His current role is with Masterton District Council, leading the Roading team to deliver all aspects of the council’s roading programme, including planning and procurement through to project management and delivery.

Presentation

Co-presented with Sanet Jooste

This presentation outlines the journey that the Masterton District Council (MDC) has followed over the last two years to develop a practical, evidence-based approach to Forward Works Programme (FWP) development.

Like a lot of provincial Councils, MDC has been collecting roughness, visual rating and maintenance contract data but had not developed an approach to fully utilise this information into our forward work programming.

As is often the case for small Territorial Authorities, our initial FWP development was done using an Excel spreadsheet and data dumps from RAMM. Since 2019/20, however, we have worked to develop a more systematic approach to modelling roading renewals.

The goals we set for ourselves in this process were:

(a) to ensure the FWP development process was evidence based;

(b) to ensure that the modelling process was systematic – using a streamlined workflow from data collection to data synthesis and finally to modelling outputs; and

(c) to ensure our models were a true reflection of our experience and knowledge of our network.

We discuss in this paper the steps taken to achieve these objectives. We specifically discuss the decision-making process – how our model decides what to spend where and how our model ensures we are getting an optimal benefit for money spent.

We conclude our presentation with lessons learnt from this journey and what our goals are for refining and improving our approach.

Scott McIntyre, The Datastack

Minimise your innovation

Bio

Scott is the Founder & Principal Consultant at The Datastack; an asset information management and digital solutions consultancy. He is fuelled by a serious amount of coffee, and he loves doing cool stuff with data and technology.

Presentation

Wait….minimise your innovation? Is minimise a typo?  

There is no typo here. Minimise is the new maximise and in this talk you will find out why.   

We will explore the concept of minimum innovation and what it can mean for your projects.  Minimum innovation is all about ‘what is the least amount of new stuff that can be added to an existing system, to deliver next level value and outcomes’.  

When implementing new systems or processes, there is a risk of recreating what you already have … just to have a flashy new solution.  However, it is possible to overlook all the smaller innovation opportunities, sitting around the edges of what is there now.  

Smaller, targeted enhancements can leverage the pieces of the puzzle that already work well. And they can enable you to manage better with what you already have, by avoiding the need to rebuild or reengineer things unnecessarily. 

This idea of minimum innovation will be further explained in the context of the RAMM system, using real world examples from recent projects.

Bruce Steven and Hannah Bennet

Application of a pavement wear maintenance cost tool under HPMVs

Presentation

In 2018 the Greater Wellington Regional Council retendered a number of public transport bus contracts, including routes that specified the introduction of high-capacity diesel and electric double decker buses.

To utilize the full capacity of these new double decker buses, the vehicles are required to operate under a HPMV permit. Wellington City Council (WCC), as the roading asset owner, was concerned about the potential increase in pavement maintenance costs resulting from the increased axle loadings.

WCC commissioned IDS to assess these additional costs on the roading network. IDS used a network performance/cost prediction tool that had been previously developed for Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency to assess the pavement wear costs of various HPMV scenarios.

The prediction tool uses historical pavement maintenance costs, pavement structural condition, HVKT, bus axle load distributions (derived from passenger loadings) and number of bus trips for specified routes to estimate the additional pavement wear costs when the axle loads of the buses are operating above the General Access (GA) limits.

The initial cost predictions were based on the pre-double decker pavement maintenance costs (extracted from RAMM Contractor records) and estimates of the passenger loading distributions and expected timetable for introducing the new buses to the network.

After two years of operation, the model was updated with the most recent maintenance costs and actual passenger numbers extracted from the ticketing system.

The outputs from the most recent modelling showed that the estimated costs were marginal when compared to the overall maintenance costs. Reasons for this low cost increase were put down to the low number of BVKT of the double decker buses compared to the network HVKT and the low percentage of time when the buses were operating with axle loads above the GA limits. 

Sean Rainsford, Lonrix

Computer vision and AI integrated with renewal and maintenance planning

Presentation

“What is the condition of my road network, and how much work is required?”. These are some common questions heard from all road asset managers around the world. Within New Zealand there are various techniques to capture such details, such as High-Speed data capture, visual rating surveys or detailed asset inspections. Within some agencies, visual ratings of distresses play a critical role in the creation of an optimal works programme. However, visual distress ratings, as traditionally done, pose three serious challenges: a) they seldom cover the entire road network, b) they do not always provide data that is useful for maintenance and renewal planning, and c) the subjective nature of visual surveys result may result in in-consistent outputs.

With the uptake of mobile phone and camera technology in place around the world, including the improvement in global positioning capability, putting the various technology pieces together with Computer Vision neural network techniques can potentially solve some of these issues. This presentation will explain the basis of how network videos are used in conjunction with other data types to determine road pavement performance and distress. The presentation will then specifically focus on how this data can be linked to maintenance and network level planning. The methods have been applied to 3 different road networks in New Zealand, with the key findings being that using the outputs and post-processing techniques play the greatest benefit of achieving usable data.

By gaining more data more consistently for any given network, combined with historic knowledge on maintenance and renewal planning, the road asset managers can be informed on both the condition, and performance, of the road network. The outputs are then used to quantify the level of investment in requiring maintaining the network to the agreed levels of service requirements. This process will result in less visits to site and enhance the maintenance planning to ensure efficiencies are achieved.

Bio

Sean has been working within the road asset management industry for over 20 years. He has been involved with pavement modelling and road data, along with supporting maintenance contracts and delivery. Through this work he has seen the linkage of data being used to support and guide asset managers throughout New Zealand and around the world in making better decisions.

Mike Harrison, Waitaki District Council

Joined up planning – putting the community first

Bio

Mike is the Roading Manager at Waitaki District Council. Mike had a varied background across Council, Contracting and Consulting.

He has held key roles at Christchurch City and Dunedin City Councils; as well as being a Business Development Advisor for Enterprise Dunedin.

Presentation

Oamaru is a service town typical of provincial New Zealand, with traditional transportation patterns. Split through its length by State Highway One and with wide throughfares, the focus has been on motor vehicle use.

Through a raft of transport and district planning initiatives, Waitaki District Council is building a platform for change. This includes ahigh level of community engagement and a collection of joined up programmes and plans.

The outcomes sought include:

  • mode shift,
  • improved safety for all road users,
  • aligning the road corridor environment with commercial activities
  • streamlining heaving traffic movement
  • and greater consideration of the transport disadvantaged and disability sector.

Craig Reed, Fulton Hogan

How far are we stretching our assets

Bio

Craig worked for WSP as a Senior Asset Manager, then moved into the NOC space as Contract Manager for 5 years and now is actively pursuing his Asset Management career with Fulton Hogan.

Presentation

This presentation will investigate some of the surfacing lives on the state highway networks of New Zealand.

Using historical surface life achievement, when compared with expected design and expected life (by linking to the forward work programme), we can see some interesting insights of our asset management processes in place within the NOCs. Linked to the use of best practice maintenance management plans (MMP) and collaboration with planning our renewal treatments, we will provide some interesting commentary on the tensioning and expectations that are in place for the surface assets on the network.

The outcome from this investigation has been used with refining and reviewing the MMP process and methods that are applied on Fulton Hogan managed networks. We believe this investigation and analysis could benefit the wider industry with more evidence-based knowledge of the surface assets on the state highway networks.

The analysis will make you think about the improved construction/maintenance practice perspectives required to be able to achieve the realistic lives that we are expecting from our surfacings, and hence programming of work becomes efficient and effective.

Kevin Dunn, Beca

Improved forward works programming outcomes through effective data driven shortlisting

Bio

Kevin is a Senior Associate and Team Lead in the Beca Asset Management team based in Tauranga.

He is a Chartered Civil Engineer with over 20 years’ experience in Asset and Network Management in both New Zealand and the UK.

Kevin has provided asset management support and advice numerous New Zealand local authorities, Waka Kotahi and the Road Efficiency Group with a focus on data driven and evidence-based investment decision making.

Presentation

Renewal Forward Works Programmes are developed by all Road Controlling Authorities and typically involves a significant amount of effort to determine the best programme within the constraints we operate.

Through this presentation we will share the approach and learnings from our experience in generating the FWP candidate site list achieving a reduced level of field validation. This improved data driven process identifies a shortlist of candidate sections on the network that are candidates for renewal using a combination of asset performance, risk and criticality within the constraints an RCA is operating. The improved process has the ability to output a draft programme for field validation that is balanced to budgets, or another similar constraint through a risk-based prioritisation considering the consequence of deferred intervention.

As well as the site selection and programming improvements other benefits including enhanced safety, improved efficiency and delivery and a reduction in energy and carbon footprint have been achieved.

We have used this on a number of local authority networks and are currently working with Auckland Transport to adopt this into their new system.

Ian Porter, Fuso New Zealand

Partnering for a sustainable transport supply chain

Bio

A leading technical expert in future-focused sustainable commercial transport, Ian is currently highly active in the delivery of zero-emission commercial transport in New Zealand, including the FUSO eCanter – the world’s first series-produced fully electric light truck.

Presentation

FUSO, NZ’s number one truck and bus brand, shares valuable insights into the roadmap towards achieving zero-emission commercial transport in New Zealand.

Grant Holland, Waugh Infrastructure Management

What if? The road maintenance task force ten years on

Bio

Grant is an Asset Management Specialist and Infrastructure Advisor with Waugh Infrastructure Management.

He has worked for a range of clients across NZ and overseas.  Grant was a co-author of the Road Maintenance Task Force – Better Asset Management, Planning and Delivery Report. Following that report Grant assisted REG with ONRC development and other REG workstreams.

Grant has been part of the RIMS Conference for many years.
He has chaired the Optimised Decision-Making stream and presented regularly.
He is always keen to encourage and challenge conference participants.

Presentation

In 2012 the Road Maintenance Task Force reported its findings to the Minister of Transport and the sector.  This was in response to revenue flatlining, costs increasing and the demand for transportation services outstripping our capacity as a nation.
That was ten years ago. 

Three National Land Transport Programmes have been developed since then and the challenges continue to mount. Climate change and emission reduction were barely on the radar then.

What if we really had run out of money? What if we had taken a different approach?
Have we learnt enough to lead us through then next ten years?

As a sector how do we address the challenges ahead; what might meaningful leadership and response look like?

In the presentation Grant will bring together the challenges the sector faced ten years ago and revisit them in today’s context.

Lily Grimshaw, Geosolve

To maintain or rehabilitate? That is the question

Bio

Lily is a Geotechnical & Pavements Engineer at the Wanaka Geosolve Office.

She is responsible for reviewing FWD data collected nationwide and played a significant role in the research, development and production of the Multi Speed Deflectometer.

Presentation

In the absence of reliable pavement structural information, the decision to maintain (ie. localised repairs or re-surface) is solely based on surface observations provided either by visual inspections or by surveillance of long-term surface condition trends including rutting, shoving, cracking, roughness and texture. Rehabilitation/renewal, due to its higher up front capital cost, is typically avoided unless structural information is obtained to confirm its need or historical maintenance records indicate that ongoing maintenance exceeds the cost of renewal.

The Multi Speed Deflectometer (MSD) is an economical non-destructive traffic speed pavement testing method used to benchmark the structural capacity of entire networks of roads. Data is averaged to 10 or 20m intervals providing near continuous structural data useful for defining structurally homogenous sections and to indicate the location of reduced capacity within the pavement cross section (ie. Is the lower or upper pavement layer critical?).

MSD data has been collected over the last 4 years all over New Zealand. When paired with HSD data, a comprehensive understanding of the pavement can be considered including both the surface and the structure. Examples provided by clients (with their permission) will be shared to show this process. Pavements with a poor surface condition can be cross checked against the structural condition to verify whether there is an underlying structural issue. These sites can then be flagged for project level testing and renewal. Sites with poor surfacing condition and no structural issues can be flagged for maintenance or re-surfacing treatment. The right solution for the right problem at the right time and over the right extents can be readily identified, providing the least net present value cost for the future utilisation of that road.

Simon Gough, GHD

Why is it so hard to create real change?

Bio

Simon has over 25 years of experience in the roading industry including all aspects of asset management, maintenance and operations. With previous roles including the Roading Asset Manager at Whangarei District Council and the Asset Systems Team Leader at Auckland Transport, Simon is currently a Principal Asset Manager for GHD. Simon’s main focus these days is on business improvement and transformation using his wide industry knowledge and his experience in business process design and the use of systems and data to support business activities and outcomes.

Presentation

In reviewing old conference presentations, I was struck by how many good ideas were presented that have not become part of the normal way we work across the industry in subsequent years.

Why is tangible and lasting change so hard to achieve in our industry?

There are a large number of initiatives and good work that occurs in our industry and yet the rate of improvement would not seem to reflect the amount of effort being put in.

This presentation will dig in to some of these perplexing challenges, identify some successes that have stuck and spread as well as answering some of these challenging questions:

  • What are the barriers to implementing change and making it last?
  • Do centralisation and standardisation have a role to making this easier or more achievable?
  • What makes more difference, having the right people or having more budget?
  • Are we trying to create too much change all at once?
  • Why is it that the more advanced analysis we do the worse our end FWPs seem to become?
  • What role does leadership have to play and what level of leadership can make the most difference?
  • Are some improvement initiatives too theoretical and not pragmatic enough?

Claire-Louise Bode, WSP

Multi-objective investment optimisation in a TCFD landscape: performance modelling, carbon pricing, and the Paris Agreement

Bio

Claire-Louise is a Senior Asset Manager and works in Asset Management & spatial analytics for WSP. Her interests and background cover an extensive range of data management, asset health, and climatology. By combining these, she is trying to couple together the world of asset management life cycles with climate adaptation, resilience, and mitigation.

Presentation

Co-presented with Cal Roughan

Transportation is responsible for 43% of domestic CO2 emissions. In recent years we have seen the introduction of the Zero Carbon Act and TCFD disclosures in line with New Zealand’s commitments to the Paris Agreement. The expectations of our industry are evolving, and with New Zealand’s emission reduction target of net zero by 2050, there is an increasing need to understand how we can undertake the task of reducing or offsetting gross CO2 emissions to facilitate a gradual decline within the transportation sector.    

 

This presentation will discuss three primary bodies of work: quantifying Forward Works Programme (FWP) carbon expenditure; introducing carbon pricing into a performance modelling tool; and a case study of how investments and performance vary under future carbon pricing scenarios.   

Carbon prices and maintenance activity emissions will be integrated within performance modelling tools to facilitate optimal investment decisions. By pricing carbon into the investment models used nationally, road controlling authorities will be able to balance asset condition and performance against carbon expenditure to achieve their respective CO2 emissions targets.    

We will present a post FWP processing tool to holistically quantify annual projected carbon emissions under each modelled scenario for the joint purposes of disclosure and comparison against actual end-of-year emissions.   

The accuracy of calculating CO2 emissions will be a key deciding factor whether national uptake of these tools occurs during FWP generation and subsequent asset construction. These proposed methods offer asset managers the ability to contrast current and future emissions over 3-, 10-, or 30-year horizons; to plan investments through a carbon lens; and to help New Zealand reach net-zero by 2050.  

Our presentation will cover:

  • Forward works programming – and its carbon impact,
  • Technology supporting the changes in road asset management, and
  • Reducing our impact on the environment.

Cal Roughan, WSP

Multi-objective investment optimisation in a TCFD landscape: performance modelling, carbon pricing, and the Paris Agreement

Bio

Cal works in Asset Management for WSP and is a recent graduate of the Department of Engineering Science at the University of Auckland. He is primarily interested in machine learning, data visualisation, and optimisation algorithms for large-scale infrastructure investments relating to decarbonisation.

Presentation

Co-presented with Claire-Louise Bode

Transportation is responsible for 43% of domestic CO2 emissions. In recent years we have seen the introduction of the Zero Carbon Act and TCFD disclosures in line with New Zealand’s commitments to the Paris Agreement. The expectations of our industry are evolving, and with New Zealand’s emission reduction target of net zero by 2050, there is an increasing need to understand how we can undertake the task of reducing or offsetting gross CO2 emissions to facilitate a gradual decline within the transportation sector. 

This presentation will discuss three primary bodies of work: quantifying Forward Works Programme (FWP) carbon expenditure; introducing carbon pricing into a performance modelling tool; and a case study of how investments and performance vary under future carbon pricing scenarios.   

Carbon prices and maintenance activity emissions will be integrated within performance modelling tools to facilitate optimal investment decisions. By pricing carbon into the investment models used nationally, road controlling authorities will be able to balance asset condition and performance against carbon expenditure to achieve their respective CO2 emissions targets.    

We will present a post FWP processing tool to holistically quantify annual projected carbon emissions under each modelled scenario for the joint purposes of disclosure and comparison against actual end-of-year emissions.   

The accuracy of calculating CO2 emissions will be a key deciding factor whether national uptake of these tools occurs during FWP generation and subsequent asset construction. These proposed methods offer asset managers the ability to contrast current and future emissions over 3-, 10-, or 30-year horizons; to plan investments through a carbon lens; and to help New Zealand reach net-zero by 2050.  

Our presentation will cover:

  • Forward works programming – and its carbon impact,
  • Technology supporting the changes in road asset management, and
  • Reducing our impact on the environment.

Obinna Akaa and Damien Douglas, WSP

Renewal of structured road markings – and its carbon impact

Bio

Obinna PhD (Civil), DPEng, CMEngNZ, MIPWEA

Obinna is a senior asset manager at WSP New Zealand.  He leads the asset management of Wellington state highway infrastructure delivered through the (Capital Journeys® (WSP & Fulton Hogan) joint venture network outcomes contract with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency.  Obinna has a proven reputation as a reliable and collaborative asset manager with a strong work ethic in the delivery of asset management services to benefit clients and the community.  His current role as part of the Capital Journeys team has seen him develop award-winning processes, methods, and tools to shift the asset management of high-value non-pavement assets from core to advanced levels.

Damien BE, CPEng (Aus), CEng (UK), CMEngNZ

Damien has 14 years of experience working in infrastructure asset management consulting in New Zealand, Australia, and the UK.  Between 2017-2020, Damien was a member of the Contract Management Team and the least Asset Manager for Capital Journeys® (a WSP and Fulton Hogan joint-venture), who are the Wellington Network Outcomes Contract supplier to Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency.  Damien now leads WSP’s Pavements & Surfacing service line.  This includes leading a team of pavement experts based in the main centres of Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, and Christchurch, as well as maintaining connections with WSP’s Regions business and Research Centre in Petone.

Presentation

The renewal of road markings after pavement resurfacing may require like-for-like remarking of the resealed road sections. However, there are cases where sections in between planned reseal (infills) may be left – untouched or are not required in the renewal contract regardless of the infill markings’ service life and condition. This gives room for poor marking continuity, a potential reduction of the markings service level, increase in carbon footprints and other stakeholders’ risks. As the asset management of high-performance structured markings includes a duty of care regarding planned maintenance, asset owners/mangers need to consider infill sites at the same time as renewing structured markings on resurfaced sections. We designed the infills method to help resolve marking continuity, efficiency, and sustainability issues to prevent returning to the same road shortly, thereby reducing customer delay and carbon impacts, and realising value-for-money without compromising road safety. Our presentation will discuss the infills method and demonstrate its application considering various assessment merits, lifecycle, and customer costs in solving the road asset management problem. The method has been used successfully to justify funding for the renewal of State Highway Road markings in the current 21-24 NLTP.

Key learnings

  • Carbon footprint reduction is feasible through well-justified road markings renewals
  • ‘Do nothing’ just justified ‘infill sites’ is an antithesis to managing our carbon equation
  • The infills method supports value-for-money outcomes and can be part of a broader MCA for sustainable road infrastructure management decisions

Erik Teekman, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Gore project

Bio

Erik is a Principal Advisor within Waka Kotahi’s Urban Mobility team.  He is a Chartered member of Institute of Logistics and Transport and has 17 years’ experience in the field of transport planning. 

Presentation

As part of the Innovating Streets programme Gore District Council sought to rationalise their road network. Rationalisation sought to use minor infrastructural levers centred around network permeability and altered intersection priorities to rebalance transport and liveability outcomes while also supporting the ‘right journey on the right road’ and the ‘right transport mode for the right journey’. Adjustments to the network were effective at altering traffic patterns which sought to concentrate existing vehicle flows onto fewer roads. This resulted in not only operational improvements but also resulted in a reduction in net forecast future maintenance needs. Reductions to net maintenance needs were crudely calculated to be equivalent to the CO2 saving that would be provided if 220 cross town vehicle trips were replaced by cyclists, everyday.

Mike Tapper, Beca

Modelling maintenance costs successfully: A significant step change in performance

Bio

Mike is a Senior Technical Director with 30 years’ experience in road asset management and network management.

Mike is the Beca practice lead for Transportation Infrastructure asset management and sits on the Higgins consolidated NOC Board. Mike recruits’ people like Lucien who know what a random forest classifier with oversampling methodology is.

Presentation

Co-presented with Lucien Zhang

A key problem for road deterioration modelling has been the lack of a reliable maintenance cost model.

The biggest indicator of future maintenance spend on a treatment length was past spend. The problem with spending large amounts historically was it either tended to fix the problem or was a sign of more spending to come.

Past maintenance cost models struggled to be able to predict the difference and ended up with a compromise in the middle, an answer that was neither.

We have developed a new maintenance cost model with very strong correlations with the field. The model uses a random forest classifier with oversampling methodology using 21 parameters including basic inventory information such as surface type, age, seal layers, pavement age, and current and cumulative ESA’s. It also takes a variety of condition parameters including deflection, curvature, roughness, rut depth, rut progression, rut depth, recent pavement and surfacing costs.

It combines all these for each 100m section within a treatment length to predict whether future pavement and surfacing maintenance costs will be in a high, medium or low band.

The results show over 75% success rate for predicting high maintenance cost sections, effectively a 75% success rate for predicting which 100m sections will incur 90% of the maintenance costs on the network. It has over a 90% success rate for predicting low-cost sections.

This data can be used to optimize maintenance strategies, identify high risk corridors, optimize renewal strategies and prioritize renewal programmes for budget changes. The process provides the opportunity to shift from the current condition-based programming to a more sophisticated risk-based approach. A more optimized maintenance and renewals program provides more efficient use of resources and improved sustainability and improved safety through less unnecessary work.

Lucien Zhang, Beca

Modelling maintenance costs successfully: A significant step change in performance

Bio

Lucien is an Asset engineer with three years’ experience with Beca, prior to those three years as a data analyst and research engineer in China.

Lucien specializes in computer algorithm design and automation, programming in a number of languages, mathematical modelling and data analysis.

Lucien knows a whole lot of really complicated and smart stuff which is why Mike hired him.

Presentation

Co-presented with Mike Tapper

A key problem for road deterioration modelling has been the lack of a reliable maintenance cost model.

The biggest indicator of future maintenance spend on a treatment length was past spend. The problem with spending large amounts historically was it either tended to fix the problem or was a sign of more spending to come.

Past maintenance cost models struggled to be able to predict the difference and ended up with a compromise in the middle, an answer that was neither.

We have developed a new maintenance cost model with very strong correlations with the field. The model uses a random forest classifier with oversampling methodology using 21 parameters including basic inventory information such as surface type, age, seal layers, pavement age, and current and cumulative ESA’s. It also takes a variety of condition parameters including deflection, curvature, roughness, rut depth, rut progression, rut depth, recent pavement and surfacing costs.

It combines all these for each 100m section within a treatment length to predict whether future pavement and surfacing maintenance costs will be in a high, medium or low band.

The results show over 75% success rate for predicting high maintenance cost sections, effectively a 75% success rate for predicting which 100m sections will incur 90% of the maintenance costs on the network. It has over a 90% success rate for predicting low-cost sections.

This data can be used to optimize maintenance strategies, identify high risk corridors, optimize renewal strategies and prioritize renewal programmes for budget changes. The process provides the opportunity to shift from the current condition-based programming to a more sophisticated risk-based approach. A more optimized maintenance and renewals program provides more efficient use of resources and improved sustainability and improved safety through less unnecessary work.

Philip van del Wel

Overview, Alignment, and Management of Drainage and SWC FWPs

Bio

Philip started his civil engineering career working in the contracting environment, where he was involved in PSMC and NOC contracts. During this time he also studied towards and completed his Diploma in Civil Engineering. Since 2015 he has worked for Lonrix Limited, where he manages projects and customer support for the JunoViewer Asset Management framework. Philip is experienced in data analysis and works with many engineering clients in New Zealand and overseas to design and create software features and developments, some of which are specifically tailored for the NOC contract domain.

Presentation

Typically in the New Zealand State Highway Maintenance space, drainage and surface water channel (SWC) forward work programmes (FWP) are managed in multiple files, spreadsheets, and minds; with limited connection to a) each other, b) the asset on which the work is being carried out, and c) associated programmes. The programmes are recorded in the Annual Plan spreadsheet, which is fit for purpose, however the information is fragmented; it is entered into a different spreadsheet for each network and into different worksheets within each spreadsheet. Consequently a national overview, alignment, and management of the programmes is difficult to achieve. To help with these goals of overview, alignment, and management of the programmes, a few solutions were required: 1) standardise the format of the drainage and SWC FWPs, and 2) develop a solution providing the ability to view and change the FWPs.

Waka Kotahi have worked with Lonrix Ltd to accomplish both of these solutions. Firstly, the drainage and surface water channel FWPs were extracted from the latest Annual Plan spreadsheets, consistently formatted and standardised, and linked to their respective assets. Secondly, a Map View was developed in the JunoViewer framework whereby the FWPs can be viewed, changed, and exported in various formats (granularly and nationally). The Map View also enables other associated FWPs to be plotted with road and asset condition data and any network videos readily available.

With overview, alignment, and management of the various programmes possible, the expectation is for efficiencies to be gained, associated costs to be saved, and disruption to the road user to be decreased.

Rowan Dickson, WSP

Managing carbon & climate information

Bio

Rowan manages the sustainability and social outcomes programs for some of Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest and most complicated built environment projects. He is responsible for working alongside Mana Whenua to integrate sustainability and climate resilience across the built environment, from business cases and planning to projects and programmes.

This includes ambitious carbon emission reductions, social outcomes, training, and supply chain development, improving environmental value of water, zero waste to landfill and best practice climate risk assessment and treatment. Key mega-project examples include the City Rail Link, iReX Picton, Manawatū Tararua Highway and the Mt Messenger Bypass which each target sustainability ratings under the Infrastructure Sustainability Council Australia (ISCA).

Presentation

This presentation is a thought piece that looks at the opportunities available for the integration of Carbon & Climate data into current asset information systems.

In 2022 the Government will release its first emissions reduction plan which sets the foundations of a low-emissions Aotearoa New Zealand. With the expectation of sector-based emissions budgets it’s crucial that we as a sector and discipline can accurately report at any given period our embodied emissions from construction, maintenance, and operational activities.

With the ongoing Asset management Data Standards project there is already a focus on what data we require for the future. This presents a great opportunity to begin embedding carbon into our base asset & data information systems including collection, maintenance, and analysis.

We can’t change what we can’t see, however with a consistent and granular carbon component built into our daily systems we can:

  • Measure our current policy emissions against proposed climate change pathways
  • Identify assets or operations that have heavy carbon emissions
  • Report over time how our assets are performing in the sustainability space

This presentation is a thought piece that looks at the opportunities available for the integration of Carbon & Climate data into current asset information systems. The following will be discussed:

  • Are we collecting the right information?
  • Where and when should we consider carbon
  • Climate risk incorporation

Scott Verevis, on behalf of NTA

Modern tools for modern data, implementing the CSA

Bio

Scott has worked within the civil infrastructure industry for over 29 years with experience ranging from civil contracting through to professional consultancy. This experience spans green field subdivision development, road maintenance through to major capital infrastructure works.

From 1996 to late 2010 Scott worked within road network management teams for Opus International Consultants where he further developed his professional engineering skills in Project and Network Asset Management on both state highway and local authority networks.

Currently Scott’s focus is working closely with several RCA’s undertaking a range of services focused on infrastructure asset management including maintenance contract development and performance management, asset valuation, pavement modelling, activity management plan development and data implementation.

Self-employed and running an asset management business since 2010, he is engaged with several local authority clients providing asset management services and advice including working on number of REG working committees.

Presentation

Problem – supporting the evidence-based approach to renewal sites for consideration, harnessing captured data, is this a stable renewal programme of work

Solution – utilise the CSA algorithm, with as many data parameters available, reality check and review logic fit of the network

Benefits – Network level planning of sites within the short term aligned to budget requirements, test and improve the CSA logic and feedback to industry, testing the data captured by the NTA

Carbon – reduction in field visits and better planning for programming of sites for operations thought the use of smarter tools

One of the challenges a rural road controlling authorities face is the maintaining a stable forward works programme. Programmes are created at the last minute resulting in inefficient planning and changes to the programme. For the Northern Transportation Alliance (NTA), a modern tool was required to assist with using the volume of data help determine suitable candidate sites for input into a 1–3-year programme.

With the recent development of the Candidate Selection Algorithm (CSA) for New Zealand, this presented an opportunity to trial this for the NTA. A key part to support this initiative is the consistent approach to road condition data collection across the networks. Gaining the full use of this condition data, combined with the improved asset inventory data, was the perfect fit for using a modern logic approach such as the CSA. To undertake this work, the CSA logic was created within the JunoViewer modelling framework. This also provided the opportunity to benchmark CSA against the current programmes that have been developed over the last few years based on strategic approach using long-term decision tool the NZ Pavement Performance model.

The key learnings provided many benefits, such as – determining what data was needed in the renewal planning for the network, was the data being collected by the NTA fit for purpose, understanding of the pavement service levels could be applied, modification of the logic to align with key characteristics of the road networks. Based on the process followed, and using the JunoViewer application, significant time savings and reduced field trips have been undertaken, therefore staff safety and carbon savings have been achieved with current programme being further tested in terms of stability. With the key outcome being that the programmes developed are further anchored in an evidence-based approach linked to our business case principals.

Sikander Singh, Tauranga City Council

From rules to objectives

Bio

Sikander works for Tauranga City Council as a Team Leader – Transport Asset Management. He has a bachelor’s in civil engineering and a master’s in Transportation Engineering from the University of Auckland.

For the past 10 years, he has been involved in the roading industry in New Zealand, initially with engineering consulting and since 2017 with the Tauranga City Council.
Sikander has proven experience in asset management and planning, asset deterioration modelling, data analysis, asset valuation, forward work programme (FWP), network condition survey and project planning.

He also has a role in the Road Efficiency Group (REG) as a member of the Evidence and Outcomes workgroup to support other road controlling authorities and Waka Kotahi to develop, enhance and standardise asset management in the field of Transportation with data improvement and performance measuring tools/projects.

Presentation

Road Controlling Authorities (RCA) in New Zealand often have multiple objectives to meet with managing the road networks. This can include things like the One Network Framework, customer needs, budget constraints, variability in road use and pavement types, etc. The current approach to accounting for these various objectives is usually a combination of processes, such as determining network need, balancing this with budgets, customer feedback and project conflicts, and then determining where to plan works over a 3 to 5 year period. The Tauranga City Council (TCC) is a 5th largest city with a growing population, which provides another dynamic and challenge to account for. TCC has centralised the Asset Management process within the council, which provides the ability to manage the approach with the renewal planning meeting these objectives.

To gain a clear understanding of the road network performance, the TCC has undertaken extensive condition data collection over the past 5 years. Previous methods have been applied to use trigger-based approaches and outputs; however, these were not found to meet the various objectives and challenges faced by the TCC team. Some thought was required on how to develop a short-term tactical FWP development tool that would handle these various objectives of TCC. The process started with having clearly defined objectives and moving away from subjective engineering rules requiring tedious and ongoing adjustment. Development was undertaken within the Juno Cassandra (JCass) model framework which facilitates multi-objective optimisation (MOO). This presentation will describe the lessons learnt along the way to developing and implementing the MOO model for TCC. We will discuss key elements such as defining objectives (including those potentially related to carbon savings), details of the methodology, lessons learnt and how we assessed the outcomes.

Tony Lange, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Consistent condition data collection. Creating opportunities to reduce carbon footprint

Presentation

Consistent condition data is increasingly important in the New Zealand transport sector’s approach to lifecycle asset management, benchmarking, performance management and investment decision making.

In the five years to July 2020, approximately $500 million per annum was invested in local road pavement maintenance, rehabilitation, and resurfacing.
The quality and consistency of the condition data is a crucial component of the evidence-based investment management and optimisation of the whole of life asset cost.

In addition, condition data is a critical indicator for maintenance programming, monitoring performance, managing maintenance contracts, comparative reporting, research, and fatal crash investigations.

The current approaches used for assessing network condition are outdated, leading to variable and inefficient collection of surfacing and pavement condition data across New Zealand.
Establishing a consistent condition data collection programme would improve asset management system outputs for both local and national decision making.
REG is developing a consistent approach to collect pavement and surfacing condition data for all local authority sealed roads.
The Consistent Condition Data Collection (CCDC) project is being undertaken collaboratively by a team of sector representatives from councils and Waka Kotahi, supported by industry subject matter experts.
The expected benefits of CCDC include:

  • better lifecycle management and performance
  • enhanced safety and asset management decision making
  • quality assured condition data
  • value for money data collection
  • health and safety risk elimination
  • freeing up crucial sector capacity.

This presentation will focus on how the three desirable outcomes will be achieved:

  1. Specifying the pavement and surfacing condition data to be collected for measuring, analysis, reporting asset and network conditions.
  2. Establishing the means to consistently collect the condition data and implementation across New Zealand.
  3. The right condition data is consistent and is available to all councils by July 2025.

Elke Beca, WSP

Waka Kotahi’s Asset Management Data Standard

Presentation

The Asset Management Data Standard (AMDS) is a collaboration between Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, The Road Efficiency Group (REG) and the wider sector, to improve the management of land transport infrastructure asset information that supports best decisions about New Zealand’s land transport assets. AMDS is a data standard that informs activity management decisions for transport so we can plan and implement activities which deliver services as expected for the cost expected. It is a common language that describes the service, impact and asset lifecycle across the transport system and partners. The standard will prepare the foundations for the land transport sector to enable digital engineering and BIM.  This presentation will provide an overview of the Asset Management Data Standard programme including Data Standard development, implementation approach and sector alignment.

Shahaanan Arulgnanapragasam

RIMS pavement and pathway's fault assessment standard

Bio

Shahaanan is an Asset Management Engineer with WSP.  With a Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) in Engineering Science.  Shahaanan’s strong background in programming, data science and mathematical modelling has allowed him to tackle a variety of complex data analysis projects.

Shahaanan’s time with WSP has specifically seen the application of his optimisation and statistical modelling skills in developing pathway and roading forward work programs for multiple Councils across New Zealand

Presentation

This presentation will be an overview of the RIMS Pavement and Pathways Fault Assessment standard to update the sector on the future of data collection
Premise:

There is currently no sector standard for the description of pavement and pathway faults. State Highways and Local Authority RCAs specify their own requirements meaning there is no consistency in the frequency of inspections, language used, the severity rating system, the data structure and intervention level.

With condition data being such a vital input into many of our asset management systems including forward work programming, CRM and performance monitoring. It is essential that we as a sector take this opportunity to agree on the form of our data libraries.

Solution:
The Pavement and Pathways Fault Assessment standard is a RIMS(IPWEA) project delivered by WSP alongside Waka Kotahi and REG, feeding into the greater Asset Management Data Standard. The standard is developed through sector engagement, compilation of existing sector materials. key stakeholder workshops to negotiate a consensus for language, descriptions, categorisation, and rating of the various pavement and pathways assets.

Key Learnings:

  • Where these guides apply
  • Fault assessment definitions
  • Condition rating and reporting

Jeremy Hughes and Roger Brady

People first – higher competency leads to lower carbon emissions

Bio

Jeremy Hughes is a co-founder and director of software specialist Company-X. Jeremy has more than 30 years’ experience in IT development consulting, delivering high quality software. Jeremy has a track record of delivering industry-wide efficiency gains through the application of IT processes and technologies. Jeremy is a University of Waikato graduate with a Bachelor of Management Studies degree.

Presentation

The Road Efficiency Group, a collaboration between Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency and Local Government New Zealand, and software specialist Company-X will focus on how the Asset Management Competency Framework (AMCF) can help the transport sector contribute to the Government’s carbon neutrality goal.

The key to reaching this goal is not technology or smarter design; it is people. The people in the New Zealand transport sector who engage with the AMCF online portal will help raise competencies and efficiency in the sector, and lower carbon emissions across the sector.

The launch of the AMCF self-assessment portal and reporting will lead to improved evidence-based decision making.

AMCF comes after REG identified capacity gaps across the spectrum of activities necessary to plan, design and deliver the transport system. The current phase is bringing the AMCF into the sector proven REG Insights.

The world’s first national roading performance measures reporting tool, REG Insights was a finalist in the New Zealand Excellence in IT Awards and Reseller News Innovation Awards.

Company-X has built the AMCF portal into REG Insights after collecting requirements from REG. Development started after designs were approved, and AMCF is being rolled out in small iterations or phases.

The key, again, is people as they engage with AMCF and the technology.

From proof of concept, to elastic cloud computing, the next iteration of AMCF is on the way in Phase 2.

Three Key Points of Learning from REG:

  1. Phase 1 of the Asset Management Competency Framework portal has been launched.
  2. REG invites the sector to log in and engage with the competency framework by March 31.
  3. Phase 2 is on the way.

 

Three Key Points of Learning from Company-X:

Small software releases allows for targeted feedback from people and a more refined product.

  1. The iterative approach allows people using the system to engage with core features before more are added. It’s a journey.
  2. No software perfectly survives engagement with people using it. The user helps perfect the end product.